Make Music Finale 2011 Isole

Selecting Magnus Choir Presets in MakeMusic Finale 2011 Generally VST hosts applications have a “Preset Manager box” to locate the predefined sounds (presets) of the plug-in and them can be manipulated by this way. However in FINALE the presets can be activated by assigning the corresponding to the ' Prog.' Setting within the ' ' box. The correct way to manage presets in Finale 2011 (Also applicable to. For ), is the following: Go to Finale 2011 menu:.

Click on = “” Box. Click on = ' '. Type in ' Program Change ' of ' ' the desired preset number (In example '44' for ' ' -. Click ' button to confirm. Note: No matter what the “Prog.” shows you, i.e. # 44 “Contrabass” because it’s GENERAL MIDI numbers. In fact, the number 44 in Magnus Choir responds to “Vinyl Choir” as in the example.

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1.-Instrument Setup - VST instruments ( Click Image to Enlarge) 2.- MakeMusic Finale & Magnus Choir VSTi ' ' ( Click Image to Enlarge) 3.- MakeMusic Finale & Magnus Choir 'VST Instruments Box' ( Click Image to Enlarge) 4.- MakeMusic Finale & Magnus Choir 'Edit Instrument Definition' for MC presets sounds. ( Click Image to Enlarge) 5.- MakeMusic Finale & Magnus Choir 'Preset Changed in Instrument List' ( Click Image to Enlarge). Magnus Choir Presets List To Assign Prog. Type in PROG. (Instrument List) the Magnus Choir preset: 1 Default 2 Celestial Choir (.In The Garden of Eden) 3 Aahs Choir (Sustained Vowels) 4 Octave Choir (Men’s Choir ) 5 Curious Choir (Odd) 6 Big Choral (Women’s Choir and Men’s Choir -Maestoso) 7 Angels Choir (Legato) 8 Magnus 1 (Sustained Vowels) 9 Oohs Choir (Sustained Vowels) 10 Synthetic Choir (Spatiotemporal) 11 X Choral (Relaxed Vowels) 12 Choralis (Choral Pad -Cresc-Decresc-Sustained) 13 Future Choir (Tenuto) 14 Magnus 2 (Espressivo - Maestoso) 15 Glorious (Maestoso - Majestic and Sustain) 16 Finale.

The list is long on what I like, but to mention a few: 1. It is functionally identical to their other levels of notation products (including their free software 'Notepad'. Start there, learn the fundamentals and then move up to the appropriate package for you - Finale being the top end. They provide many ways to enter the notation: keyboard, MIDI, mouse, etc.

Editing is simple as is all functions - the learning curve is not steep at all. I love the scanning program: I find it does a remarkable job converting scores to notation on the screen. There will be errors but because the program is so easy to use, you'll be able to fix them quickly. Layers - I write classical guitar notation, which requires as many as 4 independent layers - this works beautifully in PrintMusic. I had to figure out one work around.

I could not find a way to isolate and delete a layer. But they provide a menu to copy or move one layer into another; problem solved. And on and on.

I tried to get a better price from the makers for a second copy, but it is not to had. Amazon offered the least expensive means. For reference I use some fairly complex software (AutoCad, SolidWorks, Visual Basic, Cool Edit Pro, Sony Vegas Movie Studio, Band in a Box, Photoshop, Corel Draw, etc.) with some facility, and have written some applications. These are all fairly complex programs, but if you spend a little time to learn them, they work as expected - well, BiaB may be a bit of an exception, but at least it is consistent. The Finale program is difficult to learn, it is inconsistent in my experience, and is just plain flaky, doing unexpected things (or refusing to) without reason. There are all kinds of videos and tutorials, but they don't really convey the basics. Bad all around.

It wasn't cheap, but I'm writing it off as a failure. There are freebie music editing programs that will get the job done. Too bad, I really wanted this to work. I suppose there may be some underlying logic and consistency that would allow someone to enter and edit music, it apparently is so hard to learn that it might as well be non-existent. UPDATE - I spent a bit more time with this program to figure out what was going on.

What I needed was to scan printed piano music for modification and playback. The problem with this product was that 1/4 of the measures were misinterpreted in such a way that they had to be completely erased and reentered by hand.

They could not be corrected by editing! Company support confirmed the problem (they were at least prompt). That was not acceptable to me. I ended up buying a similar program from Musitek that works much better for my purposes. My error was in not pretesting the Finale demo program more thoroughly. It probably would have saved me a c-note. Overall, I guess I'd observe that programs that are difficult to use may not be especially well-designed in other areas, either.

ANOTHER UPDATE - I had scanned another piece of music with my Musitek system and decided to run the scan files through Finale to see what would happen. The original manuscript was printed more crisply on better paper, compared to the previous one, and the music was much more complex. Scan results were better. Finale had just a few more errors than Musitek (which was almost perfect) and for the edits I needed to do on Finale, I saw only hints of the previous problem of having to erase and manually re-enter several measures to correct one error. Additional observation at this point: for scanning, Finale is more sensitive to the quality of the printed music. I upped the rating to 2.' s.

For reference I use some fairly complex software (AutoCad, SolidWorks, Visual Basic, Cool Edit Pro, Sony Vegas Movie Studio, Band in a Box, Photoshop, Corel Draw, etc.) with some facility, and have written some applications. These are all fairly complex programs, but if you spend a little time to learn them, they work as expected - well, BiaB may be a bit of an exception, but at least it is consistent. The Finale program is difficult to learn, it is inconsistent in my experience, and is just plain flaky, doing unexpected things (or refusing to) without reason.

There are all kinds of videos and tutorials, but they don't really convey the basics. Bad all around. It wasn't cheap, but I'm writing it off as a failure. There are freebie music editing programs that will get the job done. Too bad, I really wanted this to work. I suppose there may be some underlying logic and consistency that would allow someone to enter and edit music, it apparently is so hard to learn that it might as well be non-existent.

UPDATE - I spent a bit more time with this program to figure out what was going on. What I needed was to scan printed piano music for modification and playback. The problem with this product was that 1/4 of the measures were misinterpreted in such a way that they had to be completely erased and reentered by hand. They could not be corrected by editing! Company support confirmed the problem (they were at least prompt). That was not acceptable to me.

I ended up buying a similar program from Musitek that works much better for my purposes. My error was in not pretesting the Finale demo program more thoroughly. It probably would have saved me a c-note.

Overall, I guess I'd observe that programs that are difficult to use may not be especially well-designed in other areas, either. ANOTHER UPDATE - I had scanned another piece of music with my Musitek system and decided to run the scan files through Finale to see what would happen. The original manuscript was printed more crisply on better paper, compared to the previous one, and the music was much more complex. Scan results were better. Finale had just a few more errors than Musitek (which was almost perfect) and for the edits I needed to do on Finale, I saw only hints of the previous problem of having to erase and manually re-enter several measures to correct one error. Additional observation at this point: for scanning, Finale is more sensitive to the quality of the printed music.

I upped the rating to 2.' s. Short Version: I have been using Finale programs since 2000, and for the first time I am truly enraged! I use the program primarily for composition and arranging instrumental parts for theater, so the 'Optimizing Staff' feature (removing empty staves) is incredibly important to me. It is UNBELIEVABLE to me that the feature does NOT exist in this version! Long Version: I'm a Mac user, and for the last four or five years I have been using Finale Allegro 2007 because, though it was outdated, it did everything that I needed it to do. Over that years I have ignored MANY software updates for my computer because they weren't compatible with Finale Allegro, but recently I was forced to update (for a very long and drawn out list of programs that wouldn't work without updating another).

I bit the bullet and ordered what I thought was the most inexpensive version of Finale that would do all of the things I needed. After a substantial amount of research, comparing reviews and product feature lists on the official Finale website, I came to the conclusion that Finale PrintMusic 2011 did everything that my out-dated version did. The Optimization feature, which allowed the removal of empty staves in individual systems (saving printer ink, and allowing for the use of fewer pages) wasn't included in PrintMusic 2011. This feature has been available in older versions of Finale, and is available in Finale 2012 (which is three times more expensive than PrintMusic), but IS NOT available in this version.

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No one knows. SO, I just spent more than a hundred dollars on a 'new-and-improved' version of my software, that can't do what my six year old program can do.

With all of that said, if you don't care about that feature, this product seems to do everything else that the other versions can do and is a deal price wise. The list is long on what I like, but to mention a few: 1. It is functionally identical to their other levels of notation products (including their free software 'Notepad'. Start there, learn the fundamentals and then move up to the appropriate package for you - Finale being the top end.

They provide many ways to enter the notation: keyboard, MIDI, mouse, etc. Editing is simple as is all functions - the learning curve is not steep at all.

I love the scanning program: I find it does a remarkable job converting scores to notation on the screen. There will be errors but because the program is so easy to use, you'll be able to fix them quickly. Layers - I write classical guitar notation, which requires as many as 4 independent layers - this works beautifully in PrintMusic. I had to figure out one work around.

I could not find a way to isolate and delete a layer. But they provide a menu to copy or move one layer into another; problem solved. And on and on. I tried to get a better price from the makers for a second copy, but it is not to had. Amazon offered the least expensive means.

I have always loved music and have always had music running through my head, that of others as well as my own, but had little formal education beyond sight reading and some basic skills in piano and guitar. This program not only helps me write my music clearly, which is great since I have very slow handwriting, which gets very sloppy if I try to go any faster, but I get to hear it much better than other, cheaper music transcription programs. It would sound even more realistic if I sprang for an instrument library (I think that's what it's called), since transcription programs aren't primarily designed to sound realistic, but the human playback, with its various styles, helps to make the music sound more like what you're envisioning, as opposed to many $20 programs where the MIDI playback practically grates on the ears. The interface is also very intuitive given the many functions I can perform with this program.

At first the SmartShapes seemed a little confusing because I only tried single clicking before dragging, but as soon as I consulted the manual, which is very clear and easy to refer to, it became apparent that it would work if I double clicked prior to dragging. It would probably have less of a learning curve if one were inclined to read the manual straight through before diving in, but I am not that sort of person, even when manuals have lots of pictures like this one does (I like to tinker in applications to figure out firsthand how they work before reading the details laid out for me, but if you prefer the latter approach, it is easy to take). It's also great too, because while I love being able to write notation directly, sometimes I just feel like playing the music, and I would rarely think to record or keep track of anything as I was playing.

Finale

Using a cable and MIDI keyboard, I can play a melody, chord progression, or whatever I think of directly, and set the smallest note value so it can transcribe the shorter duration notes played appropriately. This can be a fast way to get the bare bones of something in, then making edits along the way (my fingers navigate a music keyboard more efficiently than a computer keyboard, apparently).

Sibelius

The lyrics tool is useful too, and intuitive, good things for someone like me who enjoys composing for musical theater. I haven't yet tried everything Finale PrintMusic 2011 is capable of, so I can't review, say, the scanning function. Finale was very easy to install and I was up and running with 15 minutes of opening the box it came in. I would reccomend it for ease of installation and use to anyone. There are a lot of features I haven't explored yet. Straightforward instructions on how to use these. I am a piano and violin teacher.I have always encouraged my students to 'noodle' and make up little songs of their own.

We've done a little song-writing, recording of songs, but it's always a time-consuming project. With Finale, the kids play their songs for me on the piano while I'm typing the notes onto the staff. When complete, all that's left is to print a copy for the composer (who's usually pretty thrilled with how it looks on the paper).

I am still learning the features of Finale. I believe I'll be able to formulate sightreading exercises of my own and scan them to my students to work on at home. It is way fun for the kids and for me.

Make Music Finale 2008 Download

I have always toyed with composing my own music. Finale will put me there.

So far, a big 'thunbs up' on Finale for me! The software arrived very quickly and in excellent condition. I had used a less robust Finale software package in the past. This software was everything I expected and more. I play guitar and like to create original compositions. This software makes it easy to share those creations with others so they can easily play them, also. Since singers have different abilities, I find the transposition feature helpful to accommodate different vocal ranges.

The point-and-click interface is mostly intuitive and the online help, when needed, is robust, so the included manual has not had to even leave the package. The only downside, if there is one, is that the package only allows for two installs.

This gives me a little anxiety as I have had system crashes before that weren't pretty. Perhaps customer service has a work-around for this. If this is a concern, you might want to ask them about it. I didn't have that opportunity because I didn't find out about the 2 install limit until after I opened the package. This is the only reason I did not give it 5 stars. This software produces beautiful scores. It is very powerful in doing so.

It took me a while to find all the functions I needed yet, the online help menu is very helpful indeed and I produced a score that impressed even my piano teacher. Only negative surprise was that the scanning function is done with what appears a third party software (Musitek Corporation), and only the lite version is included.

I am not sure whether this was clearly stated in the product description, as I wrongly assumed that full scanning function is integral part of Finale. Yet as said, it seems to be rather a third party plug in. Text (like lyrics or chords) are not recognized.

In order to do so, an upgrade is necessary that costs at least as much as the whole Finale I bought. It is annoying that the question for upgrade appears everytime I call on the scan function for a new document. After scanning a score with triplets, some triplets were difficult to be recognize and I had to do quite a bit of manual editing to get the score right. Overall, it is a great help, makes beautiful scores and merits 4 stars in my view. For my first project I wrote a four staff choral arrangement. Some divisi, and some out of synch entrances between first and seconds in same part.

I kept the manual close by, and referred to online help a couple of times, but it printed out 7 pages of professional looking music. The only glitch was that playback didn't play first and second endings properly. I didn't have time to do the research because I had to collate and staple. I'll figure out what I did wrong on the next pproject.

The first and second endings on the print copy looked fine, just that playback didn't like the way I entered the notes. I didn't take time to learn how to use keyboard shortcuts. Did everything drag and drop. I was amazed at how neatly the notes rearranged themselves as I entered lyrics. Its a great product. I have been using 'PrintMusic' for years.

The earlier versions have to be upgraded to play on Windows Seven. You can write music with a mouse, keyboard input or with a microphone. After you notate the music you can change the key, transpose it for different instruments or voices. After you write the notes you hear it play with the sounds of instruments. This is cheaper version from the professional quality of the Finale product that professional musicians use. You can notate music faster with this software than using a pen.

It won't do everything the more expensive version will do but it is great for amateur musicans. Don't buy older versions as it may not work with current Windows Operating software.